(Source: hpstuffs)

gillansponds:

It was a funny inside a funny. 

asylum-art:

Zhang Ding: Analgesic 
Free-Standing Sculpture Tinted copper, 18K Gold, pure silver 
Analgesic is easily the most blatant of depiction of materialism. This hand in particular takes on the fallen nature that ZHANG wants the audience to see; the pills lay around the hand as if they have been dropped. 
The hand itself is holding the mass produced pain pills beyond its control. Here we begin to see the control of the market over society. 
ZHANG has taken a well known and popular household product and made it into nothing other than material gold and silver purchased and held by the hand of society. The human has lost identity and lost control, implying the degradation of consumerist culture. And now all we know is the pills given to us; the drug of the masses.
asylum-art:

Zhang Ding: Analgesic 
Free-Standing Sculpture Tinted copper, 18K Gold, pure silver 
Analgesic is easily the most blatant of depiction of materialism. This hand in particular takes on the fallen nature that ZHANG wants the audience to see; the pills lay around the hand as if they have been dropped. 
The hand itself is holding the mass produced pain pills beyond its control. Here we begin to see the control of the market over society. 
ZHANG has taken a well known and popular household product and made it into nothing other than material gold and silver purchased and held by the hand of society. The human has lost identity and lost control, implying the degradation of consumerist culture. And now all we know is the pills given to us; the drug of the masses.
asylum-art:

Zhang Ding: Analgesic 
Free-Standing Sculpture Tinted copper, 18K Gold, pure silver 
Analgesic is easily the most blatant of depiction of materialism. This hand in particular takes on the fallen nature that ZHANG wants the audience to see; the pills lay around the hand as if they have been dropped. 
The hand itself is holding the mass produced pain pills beyond its control. Here we begin to see the control of the market over society. 
ZHANG has taken a well known and popular household product and made it into nothing other than material gold and silver purchased and held by the hand of society. The human has lost identity and lost control, implying the degradation of consumerist culture. And now all we know is the pills given to us; the drug of the masses.
asylum-art:

Zhang Ding: Analgesic 
Free-Standing Sculpture Tinted copper, 18K Gold, pure silver 
Analgesic is easily the most blatant of depiction of materialism. This hand in particular takes on the fallen nature that ZHANG wants the audience to see; the pills lay around the hand as if they have been dropped. 
The hand itself is holding the mass produced pain pills beyond its control. Here we begin to see the control of the market over society. 
ZHANG has taken a well known and popular household product and made it into nothing other than material gold and silver purchased and held by the hand of society. The human has lost identity and lost control, implying the degradation of consumerist culture. And now all we know is the pills given to us; the drug of the masses.

asylum-art:

Zhang Ding: Analgesic 

Free-Standing Sculpture Tinted copper, 18K Gold, pure silver 

Analgesic is easily the most blatant of depiction of materialism. This hand in particular takes on the fallen nature that ZHANG wants the audience to see; the pills lay around the hand as if they have been dropped.

The hand itself is holding the mass produced pain pills beyond its control. Here we begin to see the control of the market over society.

ZHANG has taken a well known and popular household product and made it into nothing other than material gold and silver purchased and held by the hand of society. The human has lost identity and lost control, implying the degradation of consumerist culture. And now all we know is the pills given to us; the drug of the masses.

adventuresingay:

I was supposed to go on a date last night with a guy from Paris, however it would appear that much like their pastries, French guys are incredibly flakey.

(Source: dark-stiles)

No matter how dark it is

I know I’m not alone

Moonlight shines upon us

(Source: lemedy)

midstorm:

Started playing the LEGO Marvel Super Heroes game and the Science Bro scenes are adorable.

eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor
eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor
eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor
eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor
eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor
eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor
eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor

eluciidate:

this is how I would doctor

(Source: sandandglass)

mishakoalins:

A default ring tone is heard. 100 moms look at their purses.

asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.

asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture

Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed

Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney.

Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.

anthonyedwardstarks:

“I never met Anthony Mackie during filming and we finally got introduced at the premiere. Now I can’t get rid of him.” - Sebastian Stan

throughtheparadox:

Irene Adler||The Woman

throughtheparadox:

Irene Adler||The Woman

Sorrydid you say.. Bad Wolf?

(Source: julia-the-fan)

drawnbyregina:

Sometimes Sherlock wakes up to find John watching him sleep. He still gets shy when he sees it. Maybe even blushes a bit.
drawnbyregina:

Sometimes Sherlock wakes up to find John watching him sleep. He still gets shy when he sees it. Maybe even blushes a bit.
drawnbyregina:

Sometimes Sherlock wakes up to find John watching him sleep. He still gets shy when he sees it. Maybe even blushes a bit.

drawnbyregina:

Sometimes Sherlock wakes up to find John watching him sleep. He still gets shy when he sees it. Maybe even blushes a bit.